Ping Shan Heritage Trail – a slice of history in a modern city

There’s very little that’s actually ‘old’ in Hong Kong – buildings that are past their best are often pulled down to make way for new developments. There are a few colonial buildings dotted here and there and the odd oldish temple but to see some old Chinese architecture you really have to go out of central Hong Kong and explore the New Territories.

The Ping Shan Heritage Trail is a very easy short stroll around an area that has preserved a little of its history. I have to admit that I saw better examples of older Chinese architecture in Guangzhou (see my blog post on that here) but this is the best I’ve seen so far without leaving Hong Kong!

The HK Antiquities and Monuments Office has a map of the Ping Shan trail on their website.

To start the trail, take the MTR to Tin Shui Wai station and leave by Exit C. You should already be able to see the Tsui Sing Lau pagoda from the station exit, so make your way over to that to start the trail.

Tsui Sing Lau pagoda

There is also a handy map by the pagoda. I took a photo of it so we could follow the trail!

Ping Shan Heritage Trail map

The next stop was the Sheung Cheung Wai walled village. There are people still living here!

Sheung Cheung Wai walled village

Inside the Sheung Cheung Wai walled village

I have to admit we couldn’t get very excited about the Yeung Hau temple. It probably didn’t help that we didn’t know anything about it, but we have seen quite a few more interesting temples in our time!

Yeung Hau temple

Yeung Hau temple detail

I quite liked the fact that there was the odd old building dotted around on the route.

Ping Shan old house

The Tang Ancestral Hall and the Yu Kiu Ancestral Hall are next door to one another. This was probably the most impressive sight on the whole trail (although the parked cars really ruin the photo!).

Tang and Yu Kiu Ancestral Halls

They were pretty interesting inside too.

Tang Ancestral Hall Ping Shan

Tang Ancestral Hall Ping Shan Heritage Trail

My favourite building was the Kun Ting Study Hall. It was just a really pretty example of Chinese architecture.

Kun Ting Study Hall entrance

Kun Ting Study Hall upper floor

Kun Ting Study Hall Ping Shan Heritage Trail

I think this photo is of the Entrance Hall of the Shut Hing Study Hall, but I can’t quite remember!

Shut Hing Study Hall entrance

The last port of call (for us, as we didn’t go to the Ping Shan Tang Clan gallery) was the Hung Shing Temple. Again, it was hard to get a good photo!

Hung Shing temple

The building next door was also old, but it was being lived in! It had a very scary looking man painted on the main door.

Building next to Hung Shing temple

Door on building next to Hung Shing temple

At this point we were very near the Ping Shan light rail station so we caught a train to Yuen Long and got the MTR home.

Hong Kong light rail

The Ping Shan Heritage Trail probably took us as far out of central Hong Kong as we’ve been yet but it was very enjoyable – worth a visit if you’ve done all the main sights in HK!

Thanks for reading!

Rachel

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2 thoughts on “Ping Shan Heritage Trail – a slice of history in a modern city

  1. Nice recap! I agree with you, there’s not much ‘old’ Hong Kong to see in general, so it’s worth going to the Ping Shan heritage trail just to explore something different. But most of the sights are small and easily overlooked – so you need to go with the right expectations! It’s not going to blow your mind away, but it is a different corner to explore – and it gives you a chance to try the light rail trains, which I’ve only ever travelled on once, even after 40 months of living in Hong Kong!

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