DIY ink stamped card with silhouetted letters

At the beginning of January, I showed you how to make a paint stamped card with silhouetted letters. I really liked the way the letters were blanked out in the design and I wanted to make another card using the same method for the letters but a different method for the background. I decided to use an ink stamp this time, and see how that came out. My Mum’s birthday was coming up – the perfect opportunity!

Now, I know some people have serious collections of stamps and ink pads, but I am not one of them. I do have just a few stamps with pretty patterns, so I selected one of them and used a purple ink pad. And this is what I came up with:

using stamps to make a unique card

If you want to make a card like this, then you will need:

  • Card blank (mine is DL size)
  • Post-it notes
  • Pen/pencil
  • Ruler
  • Scissors or a craft knife
  • Stamp
  • Ink pad
  • Coloured pen (optional) – mine is gold

I covered the method for making the letters (from post-it notes) and aligning them on the card in this post, so I won’t repeat that here, just head on over to the post and start from the beginning until you have something that looks like this:

using post-it notes for temporary masking letters

Now comes the fun part! Take your stamp and stamp away over the letters. How you stamp is totally up to you. As you can see, I chose to make my pattern of stamps roughly regular with similar spacing between all the stamps, but you could overlap them if you like the look. I was trying to make my stamp pattern very neat and even but it was very difficult! (maybe a more experienced stamper would be better at this than me)

Tip: When making each stamp impression you need to press down hard so that the ink goes right up to the letter edge. Otherwise, because the post-it letter is slightly raised from the surface of the card, there will be a gap between the edge of your letter and the start of the stamp impression, which will make your letters less clear.

DIY stamped silhouette card

I have to admit that I wasn’t very happy with my stamping. Some of the stamps didn’t come out that well (especially the ones in the middle) and this meant that the edges of some of the letters weren’t very obvious. It also looked a bit boring in monochrome! (you could avoid this by stamping in more than one colour)

So I decided to draw in some more detail in my pattern with a gold pen. This really elevated the card and made it look more interesting and more special, in addition to making the letters more clear.

adding detail to a stamped card

Finally, peel the post-it letters off, and admire your card!

lacy stamping and blanked out letters

Now, I have to admit that I wasn’t 100% happy with this card. I think the stamp is very pretty but it is too delicate. The letters would have looked a lot better if I had used a stamp which had more inked area so the edges of the letters would have been much clearer.

But I’m sure you could do better! Do let me know if you have a go yourself, I’d love to see what you come up with!

Thanks for reading!

Rachel

 

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Ten minute handmade birthday number card tutorial

These cards are so quick and easy to make, and I think they’re really fun! The inspiration came out of a moment of desperation since I’d forgotten to buy a card for a child’s birthday party (and it’s so hard to find nice cards in Hong Kong!) and we needed to leave soon for the party itself! It took me about 10 minutes to make the card (but I did draw my number freehand), so hopefully it should take you about the same amount of time.

hand drawn DIY number card

You could totally adapt the design with the recipient’s initial, or even a name or words like ‘Happy Birthday’. It’s so easy to do – I think it’ll take me longer to write this tutorial than it will take you to make the card!

For this tutorial you will need:

  • Card blank
  • Paper and printer (0ptional)
  • Pencil
  • Brightly coloured felt tip or marker pens (I used highlighters)
  • Pencil eraser

1. Find an image of the number that you want to use and copy it into Word, or you can use wordart to create the number that you want in Word (I did the latter). I’ve decided to do a ‘2’ as my twins have lots of friends who will be 2 in the next few months so this card may well come in useful!

2. Adjust the size of your number until it is almost as big as your card blank. For example, the card blank that I am using folds into an A6 size, so I made my number a little smaller than one-quarter the size of the A4 Word document (the lines you can see on the picture below are the ones I drew so I could see how big one quarter would be). Now print it out.

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3. Turn your paper over and use a pencil to scribble over the outline of the number. If you can’t see the number through the paper, you could try putting a white piece of paper underneath so it shows through better, or you could put it on a window (which will make it really easy to see the number, but you might get arm-ache!). Scribble quite hard so that there is a thick layer of graphite over the number outline.

(Note: my printed number did transfer a little onto what was underneath when I did this so make sure you’re not leaning on anything too important!)

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4. Now turn your paper back over so that the printed number is facing up and place it over your card blank. Line up the number so it is sitting in the middle of your card (unless you don’t want it to be in the middle, of course!). Now trace over the number with your pencil. Don’t press too hard because you don’t want to indent the card, but you do want to transfer the graphite on the back of the paper to your card so you can see a faint outline of the number on the card (I didn’t take a photo of this because the pencil line was too faint to be seen in a photo!). If it’s not working, you could try pressing slightly harder, or turn the paper back over and scribble harder on the back before trying to trace again.

N.B. An alternative method to steps 1-4 is to draw the number freehand on the card blank using pencil. This is a lot easier and quicker but does require you to be able to draw freehand block numbers, which I am not very good at!

5. Choose a few coloured pens – 3 or 4 is a good number. (I used highlighter pens so that my designs would be really bright – after all the card is for a 2 year old!) Starting in the middle of your number, draw a diagonal stripe, stopping at the edges of the number. Change pen colour and draw another parallel stripe next to it. Repeat, cycling through the colours. It doesn’t matter if your lines aren’t exactly parallel, or the same distance apart – it’s supposed to look hand-drawn!

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6. Continue until you’ve filled the whole number. Now erase the pencil outline and you are done!

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I liked the way this card came out so much that I did some more using different patterns. You could do swirls or shapes or patterns – the sky really is the limit with this! As long as your design is relatively dense, it should look great.

ten minute handmade monogram card

I like the one on the left the best – it looks like cake sprinkles!

So simple, eh?! Why don’t you have a go yourself? Do let me know if you do, I’d love to see how yours turn out!

Thanks for reading!

Rachel

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