Ma On Shan Promenade

If you’re looking for an easy, flat (and stroller friendly) walk to pass an afternoon, then Ma On Shan promenade may well fit the bill. I’ve done this walk a couple of times with my kids and the views are lovely. However, it is very exposed so I’d recommend avoiding this walk in the height of summer!

The Ma On Shan promenade stretches from Tai Shui Hang all the way up to Ma On Shan itself. We’ve only done the walk this way round because it then finishes at a park and by a lot of restaurants but you could do it the other way too! To start at Tai Shui Hang, take the MTR to Tai Shui Hang station and leave at exit A (I think, Google Maps isn’t very clear!). Turn right out of the subway, take the first left down Hi Tai Street, then walk one block and cross Ning Tai Road to reach the start of the promenade. It should look something like this:

Ma On Shan promenade at Tai Shui Hang

Looking across the water you are greeted with this view down the river estuary towards Sha Tin:

Sha Tin from Tai Shui Hang

(apologies for the gloomy pictures, it obviously wasn’t a sunny day!)

Turn right and start walking! Along the way you come to a little playground, which kept my children amused for quite some time…

Ma On Shan promenade playground

…and about halfway along there is also a handy set of public toilets.

The view changes as you walk along. As you near the end of the estuary, you are greeted with views across the Tolo harbour to Tai Po…

Tolo Harbour and Tai Po

…and then as you round the corner towards the end of your walk you are facing the Seven Sisters and at the end of them the dam across Plover Cove reservoir (which can just about be seen behind the sailing boat).

Plover Cove reservoir dam

The promenade itself doesn’t change much:

Ma On Shan promenade

Keep going until you come to a large park, which is Ma On Shan Park. If your children have the energy by this point, there are lots of things for them to do in this park. Or you might want to just sit and enjoy it for a bit!

Cross through the park and take the nearby bridge across On Chun Street to reach a shopping mall where you can grab some food or just head home from Ma On Shan MTR.

If you like the idea of a promenade walk but Ma On Shan is too far to go, then I can also recommend the promenade along the waterfront from Tai Koo to Sai Wan Ho on Hong Kong Island. There are a couple of nice stops along the way, such as Quarry Bay Park and Fireboat Alexander Grantham, and you can finish your walk at one of the restaurants in Soho East!

I hope these have given you some ideas for easy short trips!

Thanks for reading!

Rachel

 

 

Tai Po Waterfront Park

Tai Po Waterfront Park is a lovely large park in, unsurprisingly, Tai Po in the New Territories area of Hong Kong. As the name suggests, it’s on the waterfront and looks out over the Tolo Harbour to Ma On Shan on the other side.

Getting to the park isn’t quite as easy as I had hoped, mainly because it’s not that close to Tai Po Market MTR station. We decided to take a taxi from the station to the park, but other alternatives include the 20C or 20K minibus which go pretty close by. On the way back we actually walked back to the MTR station, which was a really nice walk alongside cycle tracks and took 20-25 minutes. Alternatively, you could catch the 75X bus from Kowloon City (get off at the terminus, Fu Shin Estate, which is adjacent to the park) or the 72A from Tai Wai (get off at the Yue Kok bus stop and walk down Yuen Shin Road to get to the park).

Once you are in the park, there is lots to explore. Our taxi dropped us off at the entrance by the bowling green on Dai Fat Street. We walked past the bowling greens (via a pit stop at the toilets) and came to a playground. It was a pretty nice, big playground so we let the twins run around there for a while.

Tai Po Waterfront Park playground

Isobel liked this shiny ball in the random minimalist area of the playground intended for older kids.

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This playground was situated in the vicinity of several themed gardens. You can see where the Palm Garden got its name from!

Tai Po Waterfront Park palm garden

Beyond the Palm Garden we found the waterfront. Surprisingly, we couldn’t get right up to the waterfront in the park because the cycle track running from Sha Tin to Tai Mei Tuk goes along the waterfront below. But that doesn’t really matter, as you still get the great views over the Tolo Harbour from the park. We followed this path along the edge of the park, past a lovely open grassy area which was signposted as a kite flying area and came across this lookout tower.

Tai Po Waterfront Park lookout tower

One of the nicest things for us was that the spiral path meant we could push the stroller up to the top! (although Tom might not agree that it was a great thing to do as he was the one pushing the heavy double stroller…)

The view from the top was lovely, even on a grey day like we had. This was the view over the harbour…

Tolo Harbour view from Tai Po Waterfront Park

…and looking back, over the park…

Tai Po Waterfront Park view from lookout tower

You also got a great view of the kites flying above the kite flying area (and indeed, the whole park) from part way up the tower.

Tai Po Waterfront Park kite flying

Moving on from the tower we came across another playground where we stopped to allow the twins to run around (I think we saw 3 or 4 playgrounds in total), and then beyond that some more beautifully manicured gardens (called the Western Garden). Next to this garden was an area filled with Chinese lanterns. Very picturesque!

Tai Po Waterfront Park Chinese lanterns

Finally, we walked back through the centre of the park, past an outdoor theatre and some random elephants made of (fake) flowers.

Tai Po Waterfront Park elephants

We really enjoyed visiting this park and spent a good couple of hours there, although you could spend much longer if you brought a picnic and wanted to chill out on the grass or try all the play areas with kids. The views were beautiful as well, and would be amazing on a clear day.

Thanks for reading!

Rachel

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